Apr. 16, 2014 at 11:29pm with 1,339 notes
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Apr. 12, 2014 at 1:27pm with 306 notes
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disfiguredstick:

FAMILY PHOTO TIME!!!Based off this

disfiguredstick:

FAMILY PHOTO TIME!!!

Based off this

Apr. 7, 2014 at 8:31pm
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The Conversation
Released on this date in 1974

The Conversation

Released on this date in 1974

8:17pm with 56 notes
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Apr. 6, 2014 at 2:22pm with 1 note
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Noah

image

* * *

Dir. Darren Aronofsky, 2014

I typically try to limit myself to 5 thoughts in consideration of papers and other work I need to be doing, but there was more to talk about here. I was hoping to go with a good Old Testament number like 7 and then 12. So, here’s 10:

  1. First, as someone very interested in spirituality and film this is a refreshing movie. Playing in the same cinema as what looks like the paint-by-numbers Son of God (To be fair I haven’t seen it, but my question related to it is that at what point does it really add anything to see the same material covered in the same way), this is a Biblical story that actually brings new life and new insight into the Noah story. Fidelity to scriptural stories isn’t always the same as reverence for them in art. And, as I say about every adaptation, any change from words to images fundamentally does violence to the initial text, so that in adapting, pretending to be faithful is more dishonest to the source material, and creates tepid, uninteresting cinema. To me, film is a media that begets contemplation, and fidelity leads to just going through the motions, while a more liberal, artistic interpretation creates thought, conversation, and insight. So, while this isn’t always a successful film, it did make me think a lot about what the story of Noah means, and structurally it is still the same. And it’s nice to see that this kind of crazy version of a Biblical epic can get made 
  2. Likewise, faith that only feeds itself media that reenforces that faith isn’t really dynamic faith. And faith is perhaps the fundamental spiritual point this movie displayed, to me, so well. God lets Noah figure things out himself. He let’s him be wrong at times. Faith is tested and is stronger because of that testing. The rainbow as sign means a whole lot more in this version of the story, as the manifestation of acceptance only long after Noah has made his decisions without any sort of confirmation. 
  3. There are some beautiful moments in this movie. Ridiculous but moving moments. Interestingly enough almost all of them don’t involve the human characters which seems to complicate a movie with the question of the salvation of humanity at its very center. Particularly, the pre-flood world of the Old Testament, has to me always seemed like a strange, very different place. And this is the first movie that has succeeded in providing me with that feeling of strangeness.
  4. So, if not humans then who? Well, it turns out, and you find this out rather quickly, that Aronofksy is using elements from the apocryphal Book of Enoch (and Midrashic traditions that alter the image of Methuselah from just a really old man into an OT bad-A) namely the Watchers, fallen angels who have an ambivalent relationship with mankind (lacking the rather uncomfortable sexual elements that this tradition usually goes in). If you haven’t read any of Enoch than you may be familiar with similar fallen angel stories (generally in horror films), as Hollywood seems to like adapting it. In this case, the fallen angels have taken on a rock-based form, not unlike a Neverending Story character. But still, their fall/redemption narrative was to me, the most moving in the film.
  5. I actually enjoyed this film until the flood happens. And then it seems to fill the gaps of the short Biblical Noah story less with imagination and more typical Hollywood story, even though the presentation of Noah becomes acutely a-typical at this point. This movie does give a rather interesting explanation into one of the more curious elements of the Noah story; his drunkenness. And it kind of makes a lot of sense. 
  6. Part of this could be that at this point the external action has long since reached its climax while Noah’s existential crisis is just beginning. The other issue is that the antediluvian world, full of strange powers and anachronisms (this is a technically a pre, apocalyptic, and post-apocalyptic movie) is so fascinating that once it’s gone the movie loses a lot. 
  7. The more I think about it, Ham, who is pivotal in this act, could have gotten to where he needs to be at the end of this movie without Tubal-Cain, who is so melodramatic he’d fit nicely into a number of run-of-the-mill action epics. 
  8. I did, however, like this more than Aronofsky’s other kind of crazy mess of a spiritual epic, The Fountain. Pi fits in somehow too and we should count it a success that Noah doesn’t quite go to the same lengths to rid his mind of the madness of discovered divine communication. 
  9. People who dismiss this as an environmentalist telling of the story aren’t fully understanding it. Plus, if you’re going to use an Old Testament story as environmental message movie, you’d go with the Tower of Babel, which is very much about the violation of the environment. This film is not saying that just as God destroyed the world because of the environmental destruction of the sons of men in Noah’s time he will do it again to us (which also would miss the end promise of the story). Instead the film shows how the sons of men misunderstood God’s first commandment and their destructiveness came from this misunderstanding. To them, it was all about subduing the earth, viewing the earth and mortal existence as a curse from God that must be, through violence, placed into subjugation. That the “sweat of thy brow” was bloody, brutal punishment. While to Noah, it was about replenishing the earth, and the sweat of the brow was co-creation with the divine (in this film at times literally). That the earth, even after the fall, was God’s perfect creation and expression of grace, of which nature and animals and humans are a part.
  10. One could cross-reference this to Agamben’s concept of “The Open,” in which, humanity has freedom to reject the “biopolotical machine” which replicates and enforces institutionalized power structures against what is named “animal;” borrowing/continuing from Heiddeger, what is considered “bare” life (and illustrated in this film by the industrial and wholesale consumption of everything by the sons of men; the lesser, weak things are only there for their appetites). What is interesting in this movie is a missing any major connection between Noah and the animals. God gets the message out via a natural information network, the animals show up, and Noah leaves them to do their own thing, and he does his. Perhaps an illustration of Agamben’s sabbath, or suspension of roles, a hiatus of the division between creation that has resulted in institutionalized destruction, illustrated by the sons of men. 

Would make an interesting double feature with: The Road or the final episode of Battlestar Galactica

Apr. 3, 2014 at 11:55am with 5 notes
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Mar. 31, 2014 at 8:17pm
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Mar. 29, 2014 at 3:03pm with 1 note
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FYI: Turner Classic Movies is showing some classic avant garde films early tomorrow morning.

Starting @ 3:30 am EST after the doc Free Radicals

Deren, Jacobs, Mekas, Richter, Vanderbeek

Mar. 28, 2014 at 7:38pm with 2 notes
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Ken Burns makes a Eugene Mirman profile and I don’t even care that it’s a commercial

Mar. 26, 2014 at 10:39pm
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tv
From Dusk Til Dawn, Fargo…I’m now looking for other movies from 1996 to make into a TV series

Let’s see: Broken Arrow, Jerry Maguire, Sling Blade, Tin Cup, Primal Fear, Mary Reilly, …Jack? Eddie? 

4:05pm with 10 notes
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Mar. 21, 2014 at 4:00pm
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5 Thoughts: Dreamscape

image

Dir.  Joseph Ruben ,1984

* * 

A telekinetic man is enlisted to help rid the President of his nightmares. 

  1. This sounds like the kind of movie I should love, which may explain my tepid reaction to it. It’s a cult classic in some circles, but I wonder how much of that was initial viewings; meaning I wonder if it doesn’t hold up very well (whatever that means…one of those unquantifiable issues of taste). 
  2. There’s a light tone to this (as with most 80’s films of this sort, and the tone is especially interesting compared with the roughly similar premised Inception. Sure, you may say, that was more of a crime drama and this is an adventure movie, but then again one dealt with a guy who couldn’t go home and the other with total nuclear destruction), which is a nice change of pace (movies are far too serious nowadays), but at the same time it feels like it never gets involved in anything enough to care about what’s going on. 
  3. I wonder if this would have been more interesting had Christopher Plummer and Max Von Sydow switched roles? This is a surprisingly strong cast for this type of film. 
  4. There are two contemporary Christopher Walken movies that cover similar territory (the workings of the brain and government paranoia) a bit better: Brainstorm and The Dead Zone. Actually, put both on hold and instead read Le Guin’s excellent (and short) The Lathe of Heaven, perhaps the best dreaming related sci-fi I can think of. 
  5. Also, cf. Genesis’ grotesque “Land of Confusion” video for President’s dreaming about nuclear holocaust. There’s a paper here for someone who’s interested on Reagan, nightmares, and Nuclear war in the early-mid 1980’s
Mar. 20, 2014 at 2:30pm with 90 notes
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fuckyeahlost:

Yes, seriously: CNN asked if LOST-like phenomena is to blame for the missing plane.

Don Lemon reads a tweet from a viewed asking if this is “like the movie LOST.” Yes, movie.

Former US Transportation Department inspector general Mary Schiavo, to her credit, shot the idea down quickly. “A small black hole would suck in our entire universe so we know it’s not that, the Bermuda Triangle is often weather, and LOST is a TV show…I always like things for which there’s data, history, crunch the numbers.” 

Just as bad, yesterday, an Omaha TV station posted this on Twitter. It has since been deleted.

12:03am with 48 notes
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thefilmstage:

"By morning, you’ll be gone."
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind hit theaters 10 years ago today.
Watch a 90-minute talk with director Michel Gondry.

…And from moviefone 25 facts about the film
One of my 10 or so all-time favorite movies and my choice for the greatest love story on screen.

thefilmstage:

"By morning, you’ll be gone."

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind hit theaters 10 years ago today.

Watch a 90-minute talk with director Michel Gondry.

…And from moviefone 25 facts about the film

One of my 10 or so all-time favorite movies and my choice for the greatest love story on screen.

Mar. 18, 2014 at 5:30pm
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Movie idea: The Bracket Racket (Tentative Title)

Ideally this would take place in the not too distant future but would have been made in 1973:

A vaguely dystopian middle-America (Indiana?). The unemployed, poor, overcrowded populous’ only diversion from a harsh existence in their polluted cities is the March NCAA Basketball tournament where exploited athletes play in hopes of getting out and joining the upper class who live like kings.

This year, the powerful and mysterious BH Organization has organized a $1 Billion dollar prize for anyone who correctly predicts every game in the tournament; a diversion from their attempt to remove the few regulations that remain on work place safety. John, played by Arthur Hill, a lowly factory worker, reluctantly enters the contest in order to pay for his Mother’s medical bills. As the weeks go on, John becomes a celebrity as each game turns out just as he predicted, and a hero to the masses; a symbol of hope used by a powerful anti-establishment Radio DJ named Brother Free Throw (Isaac Hayes). 

In the futuristic BH headquarters a loosely fictionalized Warren Buffet figure  (John Houseman) and his right hand man (played by Tony Lo Bianco) begin to worry. They were told that it was impossible that anyone would win. They begin to rig the games. But the best player, sympathetic to the cause (played by Julius Harris), won’t have any of it. And now his, and John’s lives are in danger…

And it ends on a freeze-frame set to sinister classical music.